UAW Sets Up Local At Volkswagen, Chatanooga

The United Auto Workers union say they have reached  a “consensus” with Volkswagen and expect the German automaker to recognise the union if they sign up enough workers at a new local for the company’s assembly plant in Chatanooga, Tennessee.

The union in February suffered a setback in its effort to organise its first foreign-owned plant in the South when workers at the Chattanooga plant rejected UAW representation by a 712-626 vote after heavy right wing political pressure and an anti union campaign lead by local Republican’s.

Gary Casteel, the UAW’s secretary-treasurer, said the creation of Local 42 will avoid the need for another election that could involve the sort of “third-party interference” the union blames for losing the earlier vote. He stressed that no employee will be required to join, and that no dues would be collected until after a collective bargaining agreement is reached.

“We have a consensus,” Casteel said. “This is not something the UAW is doing unilaterally, it’s been thoroughly discussed with VW over an extended period of time.”

Casteel said the union is confident Volkswagen will recognize the union if the local signs up a “meaningful portion” of Volkswagen’s work force in Chattanooga, though he did not elaborate on what the threshold would be.

Volkswagen wants to introduce a German-style works council at the plant to represent both salaried and blue-collar workers, but the company’s has said it can’t do so without the involvement of an independent union.

Workers assemble Volkswagen Passat sedans at the German automaker’s plant on June 12, 2013, in Chattanooga, Tenn. The United Auto Workers unions announced on Thursday, July 10, 2014, that it is forming a local chapter in Chattanooga, and that it expects Volkswagen to recognize it once it signs up a “substantial” number of workers at the plant.

Workers assemble Volkswagen Passat sedans at the German automaker’s plant in Chattanooga in 2013.

Volkswagen spokesman Scott Wilson issued a statement saying that the company has “no contract or other formal agreement with UAW on this matter.”

“Just like anywhere else in the world, the establishment of a local organization is a matter for the trade union concerned,” according to the company.

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